Posts tagged cartoons

23 Notes

While watching an episode of Jem, I noticed the above image and my mind was blown. You see, Britta Phillips performed the singing voice for Jem on the series and she later became a member of the band Luna. (Luna was formed in 1991 years after Jem went off the air). Better yet, the girl featured above appears to be a caricature of Phillips. Is this a truly outrageous coincidence or pop culture foreshadowing? You decide.

While watching an episode of Jem, I noticed the above image and my mind was blown. You see, Britta Phillips performed the singing voice for Jem on the series and she later became a member of the band Luna. (Luna was formed in 1991 years after Jem went off the air). Better yet, the girl featured above appears to be a caricature of Phillips. Is this a truly outrageous coincidence or pop culture foreshadowing? You decide.

65 Notes

twentypercentcooler:

Not only is this the best joke in the entire series, but a year before the episode where they reveal Roxy can’t read, she’s the one who excitedly points out the sign. She knows enough to recognize the letters, but doesn’t see that it’s misspelled.
Jem is kind of perfect you guys.

I completely agree.

twentypercentcooler:

Not only is this the best joke in the entire series, but a year before the episode where they reveal Roxy can’t read, she’s the one who excitedly points out the sign. She knows enough to recognize the letters, but doesn’t see that it’s misspelled.

Jem is kind of perfect you guys.

I completely agree.

3 Notes

The live-action Spider Man and His Amazing Friends is wonderful, terrible.


From the creepy-sounding 1983 Yummy Awards on NBC.

4 Notes

A quick story for you: While browsing at the local Video Village back in 1984, I stumbled upon a videocassette of Archie cartoons. Having been a fan of the comics for a few years, I could barely contain my excitement at the prospect of being able to see the animated adventures of Archie and the gang. Although I was a cartoon junkie at the time, I had no idea of the long and overly complicated history of Archie toons. After a little bit of begging, my parents allowed me to rent it. Once I got home, I immediately decided to skip that evening’s viewing of Jennifer Slept Here and throw in the tape immediately. (Because watching Riverdale come to life trumps second-rate Ann Jillian vehicles any day of the week). My brother decided to take a break from his usual tormenting of me and took a seat on the couch. Immediately, the jangly “Everything’s Archie” theme began and I was overwhelmed by a visual onslaught of colors and confusion. “Why is Archie’s hair like that?”, I thought to myself. But this was the first of many questions that I would have that evening.
Basically, the Archie cartoon is horrible.
The character designs were slightly off model from what I was used to seeing in the comics. Archie’s aforementioned locks aside, I could live with this. But the voice work was atrocious. For reasons I have yet to figure out, someone at the Archie Company or Filmation decided that Veronica should speak with a Southern drawl. As more of a Betty guy, I found this to be lame but acceptable. Then Jughead opened his mouth and my soul died a bit. You see, reading the Samm Schwartz-illustrated Jughead books made me expect to see an effortlessly cool character whose sleepy eyed charm kept him one step ahead of his pals. But the Jughead who was currently appearing on the Zenith in my rec room was nothing as I expected. He was clumsy, seemed a bit dim and spoke in a nerdy squelch. I was heartbroken.
My brother and I quietly watched the remaining 40-odd minutes of the tape and after I shut it off he just patted me on the back and walked out of the room. I think he took pity on me for having my dreams crushed so mercilessly. I spent the rest of that weekend trying to forget that the Archie cartoon existed by reading the comics. That worked somewhat, but I still couldn’t quite grasp how things went so horribly, utterly wrong in Riverdale. Blech.

A quick story for you: While browsing at the local Video Village back in 1984, I stumbled upon a videocassette of Archie cartoons. Having been a fan of the comics for a few years, I could barely contain my excitement at the prospect of being able to see the animated adventures of Archie and the gang. Although I was a cartoon junkie at the time, I had no idea of the long and overly complicated history of Archie toons. After a little bit of begging, my parents allowed me to rent it. Once I got home, I immediately decided to skip that evening’s viewing of Jennifer Slept Here and throw in the tape immediately. (Because watching Riverdale come to life trumps second-rate Ann Jillian vehicles any day of the week). My brother decided to take a break from his usual tormenting of me and took a seat on the couch. Immediately, the jangly “Everything’s Archie” theme began and I was overwhelmed by a visual onslaught of colors and confusion. “Why is Archie’s hair like that?”, I thought to myself. But this was the first of many questions that I would have that evening.

Basically, the Archie cartoon is horrible.

The character designs were slightly off model from what I was used to seeing in the comics. Archie’s aforementioned locks aside, I could live with this. But the voice work was atrocious. For reasons I have yet to figure out, someone at the Archie Company or Filmation decided that Veronica should speak with a Southern drawl. As more of a Betty guy, I found this to be lame but acceptable. Then Jughead opened his mouth and my soul died a bit. You see, reading the Samm Schwartz-illustrated Jughead books made me expect to see an effortlessly cool character whose sleepy eyed charm kept him one step ahead of his pals. But the Jughead who was currently appearing on the Zenith in my rec room was nothing as I expected. He was clumsy, seemed a bit dim and spoke in a nerdy squelch. I was heartbroken.

My brother and I quietly watched the remaining 40-odd minutes of the tape and after I shut it off he just patted me on the back and walked out of the room. I think he took pity on me for having my dreams crushed so mercilessly. I spent the rest of that weekend trying to forget that the Archie cartoon existed by reading the comics. That worked somewhat, but I still couldn’t quite grasp how things went so horribly, utterly wrong in Riverdale. Blech.

13807 Notes

Politics, Latveria-style.

3 Notes

basedonnothing:

The National covered a song from Bob’s Burgers As if the The National couldn’t get anymore fantastic, they have covered a song from yesterday’s Bob’s Burgers episode. In the episode, Linda Belcher began singing an original song about Thanksgiving. Then, seemingly out of nowhere, The National recorded a cover version of that…For more click here: http://gd.is/4y2ZMg

Everything about Bob’s Burgers is great. That is all.

basedonnothing:

The National covered a song from Bob’s Burgers As if the The National couldn’t get anymore fantastic, they have covered a song from yesterday’s Bob’s Burgers episode. In the episode, Linda Belcher began singing an original song about Thanksgiving. Then, seemingly out of nowhere, The National recorded a cover version of that…For more click here: http://gd.is/4y2ZMg

Everything about Bob’s Burgers is great. That is all.

1 Notes

collectemall:

Apparently there’s a new Spider-Man flick out in the cinemas now. The Lizard is the villain this time out. For my money, the defining incarnation of Lizzie is from the jazzy Spider-Man cartoon from the sixties. 

collectemall:

Apparently there’s a new Spider-Man flick out in the cinemas now. The Lizard is the villain this time out. For my money, the defining incarnation of Lizzie is from the jazzy Spider-Man cartoon from the sixties. 

3 Notes

Because my life is strange, I just found myself researching the Pound Puppies Wikipedia page. Which unearthed this nugget of info when discussing the 1986 gem Pound Puppies and The Legend of Big Paw:

Critical and box office reception
The film was panned by critics, and poorly received at the box office. Shoddy animation, character inconsistencies, and a color palette that differed from the show’s were among the chief complaints. The movie was also not part of the show’s continuity.
Fans were also confused by the apparent romantic pairing of Nose Marie and Cooler, which contradicted events that had taken place in the first season of the series. In addition, the movie is set in the 1950s with the story being narrated by Whopper, who in the present day is now an older dog who tells the story to his nephew and niece. The new characters that were introduced in the movie were Beamer, Reflex, Marvin McNasty(Replacing Katrina Stoneheart’s role as villain), Lumpy, Bones, Jeff, Tammy, The Pound Purries(Hairball and Charlamange), Collette, and Big Paw. Also, Holly, Katrina and Brattina, along with Catgut, do not appear at all in the movie.

That’s right folks. Pound Puppies have a complexity than any of us could have possibly imagined. (How could they put Nose Marie and Cooler together? Those fuckers). I don’t know which is more troubling: that a Pound Puppies movie was a thing or that someone felt so passionate about how it played fast and loose with the Pound Puppies “mythology” that they complained about it on Wikipedia.
Ahh, the Internet.

Because my life is strange, I just found myself researching the Pound Puppies Wikipedia page. Which unearthed this nugget of info when discussing the 1986 gem Pound Puppies and The Legend of Big Paw:

Critical and box office reception

The film was panned by critics, and poorly received at the box office. Shoddy animation, character inconsistencies, and a color palette that differed from the show’s were among the chief complaints. The movie was also not part of the show’s continuity.

Fans were also confused by the apparent romantic pairing of Nose Marie and Cooler, which contradicted events that had taken place in the first season of the series. In addition, the movie is set in the 1950s with the story being narrated by Whopper, who in the present day is now an older dog who tells the story to his nephew and niece. The new characters that were introduced in the movie were Beamer, Reflex, Marvin McNasty(Replacing Katrina Stoneheart’s role as villain), Lumpy, Bones, Jeff, Tammy, The Pound Purries(Hairball and Charlamange), Collette, and Big Paw. Also, Holly, Katrina and Brattina, along with Catgut, do not appear at all in the movie.

That’s right folks. Pound Puppies have a complexity than any of us could have possibly imagined. (How could they put Nose Marie and Cooler together? Those fuckers). I don’t know which is more troubling: that a Pound Puppies movie was a thing or that someone felt so passionate about how it played fast and loose with the Pound Puppies “mythology” that they complained about it on Wikipedia.

Ahh, the Internet.